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Dialogue following No. 6


Rosa.:
(aside to Tare). Uncle, you must say something to him, poor fellow.
Tare.:
Say? Why, what can I say?
Rosa:
Oh, a few words of course - that you are glad to see him back again and so on.
Tare.:
But I'm not.
Rosa:
Never mind, pretend you are - leave it to me. (Goes up to Hebblethwaite.) Mr. Hebblethwaite, Uncle tells me to say that he is delighted at the fortunate accident that has procured him the pleasure of seeing you again.
Hebble.:
My dear Sir (shaking hands with Tare).
Rosa:
That he hopes you will consider his house your home until to-morrow evening.
Hebble.:
Until to-morrow? until to-morrow week if you like!
Tare.:
But I say, Rosa —
Rosa:
He also wishes me to say that he would have told you this himself, but he thought it would come more prettily from my mouth.
Hebble.:
It does, it does. My dear Sir Ebenezer, the warmth of this welcome overpowers me.
Tare.:
But, Sir, I say - (sharply to Rosa) Rosa, go to bed!
Rosa:
But, Uncle —
Tare.:
Go to bed, Miss. (aside to Rosa) I'll talk to you about this to- morrow.

(Exit Rosa.)

Tare.:
Well, Sir, as it seems my niece has given you to understand that I'm extremely glad to see you back again...
Hebble.:
Thank you, thank you, I know you are.
Tare.:
I said nothing of the kind, Sir; I say, as my niece has expressed as much, I am put to the disagreeable necessity of echoing her opinion. So, Sir, if you will take your candlestick, Mistress Mac Motherly shall show you to your room. The room is in the roof, Mistress Mac Motherly, where the rats are. Good-night, Sir, and pleasant dreams to you.

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