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MIDI Symbol

DEVIL. (recit.)
  Since it dwelt in that rock whose hallowed crest
    Lies sunk in Orient sea,
  This stone it hath pressed full many a breast
    Of gallant and proud ladye.
  For all have sued for this glittering thing,
    And squire and lord and clown;
  Yea, once lay next the heart of a king
    Who counted it more than his crown!

SONG


Walter Passmore as the Devil
I gave it away to a love-lorn maid
  Who wept, for her heart was free;
And lo, when this stone in her breast was laid,
  She grew passing fair to see!
And a knight rode by, and he knelt and prayed,
"For thy beauty life were freely paid —
  Now what wilt thou give to me?"
"Sir Knight, I have naught!" laughed she,
"Sir Knight, I have naught for thee!"
But still at her feet, as he made his moan,
From out her bosom she drew the stone;
And that knight rode forth — but he rode alone,
  And he laughed, for his heart was free!
And they buried a maiden all skin and bone;

    And so it befell,
At the toll of the bell,
At the toll of the bell,
  This stone had come back to me.
And anon it sped over sea and land,
  It journeyed o'er land and sea,
It hath lodged in many a fair maid's hand —
  Yet it ever comes back to me.
It ever comes back to me.

Then it passed to a miser of grisly hue,
  With a beard that fell to his knee;
And he cuddled his gold, yet he fain would woo
  A lady of high degree!
And he laughed when he saw how fair he
    grew —
Yet ever she sighed as he came to sue,
  "Nay, what wilt thou give to me?"
"Rich gems have I none," groaned he,
"I have naught but my love for thee!"
And at night, as he lay and dreamed of gold,
She drew from his gaberdine's innermost fold
Drew this glittering stone — and his heart grew
    cold;
  But she laughed, for her heart was free!
And they buried a miser withered and old;

    And so it befell,
At the toll of the bell,
At the toll of the bell,
  This stone had come back to me.
And anon it sped over sea and land,
  It journeyed o'er land and sea,
It hath lodged in many a fair maid's hand —
  Yet it ever comes back to me.
It ever comes back to me.

As the DEVIL concludes his history of the stone, there is a faint cry from LAINE's room,
and a low, distant rumble of thunder.

JOAN and SIMON (still clinging to each other). Holy Paul!

DEVIL (at the door leading to the alley — in a loud voice). Vox quibus Deus benedixit benedicite!

He disappears, as LAINE enters and stands before her parents, erect and wondrously beautiful. She has abandoned her little cap, and her hair, encircling her head like a glory, falls luxuriantly to her waist; and upon her arm she carries her useless crutch as though she were bearing a lily.

MIDI Symbol

End of Scene 1.

MIDI Symbol

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