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MIDI Symbol

CHORUS.
  Go, bring forth old Simon's daughter!
(pointing to PEPPIN.) Here's a lord who counts her fair;
  Long in wedlock he hath sought her,
    And would crown her golden hair

MEN. WOMEN.
With this gar-
---- With this garland
land he he hath wrought her Out
hath wrought her — of gems most rich and
Out of gems most rich and rare! rare, Out of gems most rich and rare! Faith, a gal-
land knight we've 
Faith brought
her; Come 
a gallant knight then, greet the happy pair!
Aye faith, 
we've brought her; a gallant knight we've
Come then, brought her Come and
greet the happy pair! greet the happy pair, the happy pair!

CHORUS.
    Come then, come then, greet the happy pair!
  Faith, a gallant knight we've brought;
    So greet the happy pair!

From the alley comes LAINE, transcendently beautiful, as at the end of the previous
scene. The men and girls follow wonderingly.

PHILIP (rising from his chair in amazement and admiration).
    By Our Lady, she is fair!
CHORUS. What is this? Nay, look again!
    It is! and yet it cannot be!
PHILIP. Angel face without a stain,
    Eyes that muse in ecstacy!
CHORUS. Away! we sought the cripple Laine!
    Nay, look again, for this is she!
PHILIP. Sweet, wondering maid, if thou wilt deign
    To take thy crown, it waits for thee!
NICHOLAS. Where then hath fled that hump upon her shoulder,
    If this be Laine?
PHILIP. Nay, whence have come those tresses that enfold her,
    Like golden rain?
NICHOLAS. Her hollow eyes were dim, her wan cheek whiter
    Than frozen snow!
PHILIP. Lips like a rose-red flower, those eyes are brighter
    Than earth can show.

SAIDA (to PHILIP).
  Ah, let her not lure thee on!
    Oh, turn thine eyes away,
  Let her not lure thee on;
    Though fair she seems to-day,
  Bid her begone!
    For how can beauty stay
  Where all was foul before?
    For how can beauty stay
  Where all was foul before?
    Then turn thine eyes away,
  And gaze no more!
    Turn thine eyes away,
  And gaze no more!

SAIDA. PHILIP. CHORUS 1. CHORUS 2.
    Oh, turn thine eyes Oh turn
    away thine eyes
    Let not
  Was ever sprite or fay her lure thee on; away —
  So fair  
  to look upon? Tho' fair Tho' fair
    Tho' fair Tho' fair
  Shall  
  beauty hold its sway she seems today she seems today,
  When thou Bid her Bid her
Oh, turn art gone? begone — begone —
  When thou  
those eyes art gone Tho' fair Tho' fair
away    
And gaze Then lift she seems she seems
  thine eyes  
no more! -- and say, today today
  Woo'd from what faery  
Turn thine eyes shore, Thy feet Turn thine eyes and
  have found  
away their way away
  To earth   no
And gaze once more! and gaze no more!
  have found their  
And gaze no more! way To earth once more! no more! no more!

SAIDA. In vain ye plead, some magic spell enthralls him!
GUNTRAN.   Aye, 'tis in vain! he will not heed your cry!
DEVIL. What if it be the Devil's voice that calls him!
SAIDA.   Yea, 'tis a witch he worships! Let her die!

SOPRANOS. MEN.
A witch!
A witch!
a witch!
a witch!
Beware!
Beware!
beware!
beware!
Round
about her draw not nigh! Round about her draw not nigh,
yet draw not nigh,
draw not nigh!

CHORUS.
  Bind her! burn her! Have a care,
    For see, she hath the evil eye!
  A witch, a witch! Beware, beware!
    Or on a broomstick she may fly
  Up and up and through the air!
    A witch! a witch! then let her die!
    A witch! a witch! then let her die!
      A witch!

They circle her, advancing and retreating with alternating rage and fear. In the end
they fall upon her and seize her, as
JOAN and SIMON force their way through the
crowd.
LAINE rushes to her mother in terror.

JOAN. What would ye do? Lord Philip, spare, oh, spare her!
SIMON.   Wretches! ye knew her well an hour ago!
JOAN. What though her poor, wan cheek be now grown fairer,
    'Tis Heaven's sweet miracle hath made her so.
SIMON. Yea, Heaven hath made her fair, then wherefore fear her?
    This is no witch ye look upon to-day.
JOAN. Down on thy knees! Sweet lord, we prithee hear her!
PHILIP. Stand back, ye knaves, and thou, sweet maid, draw nearer!
    Whence came thy wondrous beauty, speak and say!

LAINE.
  I can but tell I knelt and prayed
    To Her who hearkens when we cry,
  "Mother, as Thou wert once a maid,
    Oh, let me love, or bid me die!"
  Still I was crooked, halt, and lame
    And knew not then she heard my prayer,
  But now I know, for, lo, there came
    A holy man who made me fair.

PHILIP.
  Enough, enough! ye have but to behold her!
    Nay, scan her well and tell me, if ye dare,
  What devil's art or witch's wile could mould her
    There where she stands the fairest of the fair?

  When the rose-leaf lies on the dew, do we ask if it fell from the rose?
    If honey be sweet on our lips, know we not it was stored by the bee?
  When the wind blows salt in our teeth, do we wonder from whither it blows?
    Nay, though the shore be afar, though the shore be afar,
      yet we know that it comes from the sea!
Yet we know that it comes from the sea!

CHORUS.
  When the rose-leaf lies on the dew, do we ask if it fell from the rose?
    If honey be sweet on our lips, know we not it was stored by the bee?
  When the wind blows salt in our teeth, do we wonder from whither it blows?
    Nay, though the shore be afar, though the shore be afar, afar,
      yet we know that it comes from the sea,
yet we know that it comes from the sea!

PHILIP.
  Sweet maid, Heaven too lies afar,
    yet we know that from Heaven alone
  Come those lips that an angel hath kissed,
    and those eyes with the light of a star!
    And those eyes bright as a star, as a star!
  Though with roses we crown thee to-day,
    and girdle thee round with a zone,

CHORUS.
  Though with roses we crown thee to-day,
    and girdle thee round with a zone,

PHILIP. CHORUS.
Is there aught
that shall bind thee to earth Is there aught that shall bind
whose home lies thee to earth whose homes lies beyond
afar? and afar afar
is there aught that shall bind thee shall bind thee to
to earth whose home lies beyond and afar? to earth whose homes lies beyond and afar?

PHILIP and CHORUS.
  Is aught that shall bind thee,
    shall bind thee to earth whose home lies beyond,
    lies beyond and afar,
    whose home whose home lies beyond and afar,
    lies beyond and afar, lies beyond and afar?

PHILIP, having crowned LAINE with the wreath of rose-buds, clasps the silver
girdle about her waist as the curtain falls.

END OF ACT I.

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