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MIDI Symbol

GUNTRAN.
  I'll tell them what thou wast when first I knew thee;
    A stripling boy in deeds of valour nursed,
  Ere yet this plague of beauty came and slew thee,
    And left the thing thou art — accurst! accurst!
  Aye, slew thee! for 'tis beauty hath bereft us
    Of all we loved, and he that fills thy place —
  This craven knight the ruined years have left us —
    Bears but the waxen image of thy face!

  Yea, Philip, for thy soul is dead
    That made thee once fit mate for men,
  As steadfast midst the rout that fled.
    Thy sword withstood the Saracen!
  'Twas there I knew thee, loved thee, first!
Behold thee now — accurst! accurst!

  'Twas not enough thy youth should waste and wither
    Beneath yon Eastern wanton's blighting spell;
  Nay, though her charm be spent, yet now comes hither
    This flaxen toy to lure thy soul to hell!
  Whate'er was left of manhood when she found thee —
    Ah, none can say from whence her beauty came! —
  Is hers to win; her arms shall wind around thee,
    And hers the honeyed kiss shall end thy shame!

  Then take the poison from her lips,
    The hours are few that are left to thee;
  Yea, for thy heart's blood drains and drips,
    And Time draws near to claim his fee.
  Go, go fan ye passion's lingering flame,
Or love himself shall cry thee shame!

GUNTRAN goes out, on the left.

PHILIP (to the DEVIL, who has been holding him back).
  Release me! Shame! My sword! my sword!
He may not live that spake that word!
   
LAINE. Ah! let me hence!
   
DEVIL (releasing PHILIP).
  Heed not what this poor dotard cries;
'Tis naught to thee — thou hast Love's prize!
   
LAINE. Let me go hence!
   
SAIDA (in scorn).
  Yet see those angel eyes are wet
With scalding tears!
   
PHILIP (to LAINE).
  Weep not, thy heart shalt soon forget
These passing fears!
   
LAINE. Nay, let me go! I must! I must!
My heart is stricken to the dust,
Each word as with a javelin thrust
Did pierce it through!
   
PHILIP. Thou shalt not go. I'll hear no more;
I hold thee close! Shut fast the door!
   
LAINE. What wouldst thou do?

The DEVIL goes into the arcade and gives orders. The doors admitting to the arcade
are shut by attendants; and, one by one, other doors are heard to close with a clang
and rattle.

LAINE.
  Nay, wert thou more than all he said thou art,
    Yet even so,
  Some pity lingering in thy fallen heart
    Would bid me go!
  What have I done? If love were my offence,
    That love is slain;
  It cannot hurt thee more, then let me hence
    Or end my pain!
  Aye, kill me! or should beauty prove my fault,
I'll pray to Heaven to make this body halt
    And lame again,
  So thou wilt let me go from whence I came,
    And hide my head!
  Thou wilt not? Then I too do cry thee shame!
    'Twas sooth he said —
  This is some other lord that bears thy name;
    And thou art dead!

PHILIP. I prithee peace! Let be! Let be!
  Go, take thy way! For thou art free!

The doors are opened at his command and LAINE runs out, leaving PHILIP overcome
with remorse. When she has gone he sinks upon a seat and bows his head upon
the table despairingly.

SAIDA (to the DEVIL).
  She's gone! my power returns at last!
     
DEVIL (restraining her).
  Not yet! not yet! The memory of her holds him fast.
     
SAIDA.
    He shall forget.
(to PHILIP). Nay, grieve not; in a little while
  Thine eyes shall gaze on that sweet isle
    Where first we met!
  'Tis there, where flowering valleys smile,
    Love's bower is set!
     
PHILIP.
  I see her tears: I hear her cry,
    "'Twas sooth he said"!
  Away! away! The end draws nigh,
The broken cup of life runs dry;
    My heart is dead!
     
SAIDA (to the DEVIL).
  He will not heed! What need to stay?
    All, all is gone!
     
DEVIL.
  Nay, nay, didst hear that maiden say
That now she fain would fling away
    What scarce was won?
     
SAIDA.
    Think you that beauty may be mine?
     
DEVIL.
  Yea, thou shalt taste of life's new wine!
Or magic spell, or gift divine,
This maiden's beauty must be thine
    Ere night be done!
     
SAIDA and DEVIL.
  Or magic spell, or gift divine,
This maiden's beauty must be mine/thine
    Ere night be done!

SAIDA and the DEVIL creep away after LAINE. As they go, GUNTRAN enters from the
left, followed by the Lords of Sirault, Velaines, and St. Sauveur — three grim-looking warriors — and the knights of their retinue.

GUNTRAN.
  Lords of Sirault, Velaines, and St. Sauveur,
    Would seek lord Philip? Then behold him now!
  Ye that have known him in the days that were,
    Say whence hath come that brand upon his brow?


Cory James as Lord of Sirault
THREE LORDS.
  Philip, at the dawn of day
Forth we ride upon our way;
    Beware! the dawn is near!
  Night is spent! awake! awake!
    Lift those leaden eyes and say
  What answer dost thou bid us make
    To him that sent us here!

PHILIP.
  Go hence and say my race is well-nigh run,
    From out this breast all lust of war hath fled;
  Yea, shame and fame and glory all are one;
    Go tell him this — that lord ye sought is dead.

GUNTRAN.
  Enough, enough! from this day forth,
    Whate'er my chance, I know thee not!
  These withered limbs be little worth,
    Yet this right arm hath not forgot
      Its ancient use.
  On, on, my lords! Yea, though the end of all be
      nigh,
    I'd liefer meet those rebel swords
  Than serve with one who dares not die!

PHILIP (taking down the sword which hangs above
    the throne-chair).
  A lie! my lords, a lie! Whate'er he saith,
    There lives no man can boast that he hath
  seen
  These eyes affrighted at the eyes of death!
    Go, tell your liege I'll greet him at Flourines!

Gradually the knights of PHILIP's retinue have assembled in the arcade with their dames; the knights now enter the apartment, while their
ladies gather in the distance full of bustling
curiosity
.

PHILIP (turning to his knights).
  And ye who serve me, see, this sword is drawn
    That all too long within its sheath hath lain!
  If so ye love me, ride with me at dawn
    Or meet me not in fellowship again!
  Who called me coward? Guntran, it was thou!

GUNTRAN.
  Philip of Mirlemont, I know thee now!
     
ALL.
  All hail to Philip, Lord of Mirlemont, of Mirlemont!
    All hail! all hail!

End of Scene 1.

MIDI Symbol

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