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Dialogue following No. 4


Terence.
Well, Mr. Bunn, I shall engage you.

Bunn.
Thank you, sir. (gratified)

Terence.
Not because I think you will be any use, for your methods seem to me to border on burlesque; but because, having forced yourself into our secret meeting, it would be necessary by the rules of our society to exterminate you if you were not promptly made one of us. Henceforward you will be a member of the Clan-na-Gael. It is the only way to insure your life.

Bunn.
I see -- a rather heavy premium, but -- I see.

Terence.
I'm glad you do. You will go through the ceremony of initiation and branding at our midnight meeting. (To others.) Where shall we hold it?

Dan.
At the caves -- the Caves of Carrig-Cleena. It's a lonely place.

Terence.
Very well. Go there at once. I will find the way and follow in an hour. You can trust this gentleman to me. (Showing pistol.) Let the password be "Erin-go-bragh."

ALL.
Erin-go-bragh!

Bunn.
(feebly) Erin-go-bragh'

MIDI File MIDI File [3KB, 0' 22"]

Exeunt all to reprise, except Terence and Bunn.


Terence.
Mr. Bunn!

Bunn.
Sir!

Terence.
I have no wish to confide my love affairs to you - but -

Bunn.
Go on, sir. I'm a bachelor myself.

Terence.
But there is no help for it. I am in the anomalous position of being secretly engaged, though a rebel, to the daughter of the Lord Lieutenant. I am now going to try to obtain a secret interview with the lady I love - the question is, what shall I do with you?

Bunn.
Oh, don't mind me, sir. (Going.)

Terence.
It's the question of how to mind you that troubles me. Ah! (Enter Murphy.) Blind Murphy -- it would be absurd to ask you to keep an eye on this gentleman -- but (taking a halter from side of cottage, and placing noose round Bunn's neck) keep your hand on him -- so. (Giving end of cord to Murphy.) The cord will not slip over his head, (trying noose) and if he tries to slip over the bridge - (to Bunn) but I think I can trust you.

Bunn.
I think you have trussed me.

Terence.
I have a contempt for that form of humour, sir!

Bunn.
And, dash me, if I admire yours, sir -- dash me if I do!

Exit Terence through park gates. Bunn cautiously produces a large knife and is about to cut the cord.


Murphy.
What are ye doin' with that knife?

Bunn.
I am going to cut my hair. For a blind man, you are extremely inquisitive.

Murphy.
I'm not blind at all.

Bunn.
(scrutinizing him) Do you mean to say you are an imposter - that you have been deceiving people all your life?

Murphy.
Only since I left school, when my father taught me blind-fiddlin' - the only honest trade he knew. You're the first I've undeceived, so ye needn't complain. Listen! It's you that shall cure me of my blindness. It's a great little Quack Doctor ye shall be, and restore my sight - the aisiest thing in life, seeing I was never without it. The fame of your miraculous cure will spread through the land like the potato disease. It's not money you'll want, but the room to stack it.

Bunn.
It's worth considering. But if you have never been blind, why do you want to be cured?

Murphy.
Look down the road. What do you see?

Bunn.
A colleen. As far as I can tell, a sweetly pretty young person.

Murphy.
That's why I want to be cured. It's this way: how can I tell she's sweet and pretty while I'm blind? How can I tell her how she looks, and how can I ask her to look at me, if I'm blind?

Bunn.
You couldn't do it, of course.

Murphy.
Of course not. And how can I tell her I've never been blind without sayin' I'm a mean, deceivin', thievin' hypocrite, that's been stealin' her pity under false pretenses? A miraculous cure is my only remedy, and it's you that shall supply it. Whist, now!

Enter Molly.


Louie Pounds as Molly O'Grady and Henry Lytton as Pat Murphy.
Molly and Murphy
Murphy.
Molly, darlin', is that you?

Molly.
I am that.

Murphy.
I have news for ye.

Molly.
They're sayin' that Terence O'Brian is here. (Regarding Bunn.) Is that him? Well, it's the littlest man are often the great ones.

Bunn.
I am not Mr. O'Brian. I am Professor Bunn, the distinguished oculist.

Murphy.
More than that, Molly, he's an eye-doctor! Molly, what would ye say if he were to tell me he could cure my blindness?

Molly.
When he'd done it, I'd marry him tomorrow if he asked me. I can't say worse than that.

Murphy.
If he cured me, you'd marry him?

Molly.
Yea, Pat -- if he cured you.

Bunn.
I feel convinced your cure will be effected in a few hours.

Exit Molly into Murphy's cabin.


Murphy.
I'll not be cured by you at all. It's some other way I'll find.

Bunn.
My dear sir, a bargain's a bargain. I can't help the ladies running after me.

Murphy.
Maybe I can. (Enter Terence from park.) Terence, avick, it's the little Professor here I find is a traitor and a spy -- and he'd beat be hanged, take my word for it.

Bunn.
Well of all the - if you'll kindly listen -

Molly.
(Appearing at door.) It's deeds more than words I'd listen to.

Terence.
Yes. You shall have one chance of proving your usefulness. Deliver this letter to Lady Rosie's maid, up at the house. I have tried and failed. The sentries would not let me pass. Succeed, and your life shall be spared.

Bunn takes note as Sentry appears at gates. Bunn approaches him.


Sentry.
Passers-by will not pass by without a pass. If passers-by pass by without a pass, they will pass out and pass by. Them's my orders. Pass on.

Bunn.
Listen, my good man. Everyone has his price. Now, if I walk on and come back again, what will you charge?

Sentry.
Bayonets! (Does so.)

Bunn.
H'm!

Sentry.
Passers-by will not pass by without a pass. If -

Bunn.
Stop! I am going to show you a pass -- several passes - which you've never seen before. Look at me. (He mesmerizes the Sentry, puts him in a convenient attitude, then passes by him up avenue. The Sentry remains rigid.) Bong soir! (Raises his hat, and exit.)

Terence.
Mesmerism! I shall keep my eye on him -- but he shan't keep his on me!

Enter Molly. She goes to well and draws some water.


Molly.
(aside to Terence) Listen, your honour. If ye stay here, bear me out in all I say before poor blind Pat, and say nothin' yourself of what ye see a poor girl doin' for the sake of - of friendship for a poor boy. (As she goes across.) Are ye not afraid at all of having Carrig-Cleena for your hiding place? (She sits and begins to peel a bowl of potatoes which she has brought from cabin.)

Terence.
Why should I be?

Molly.
Don't ye know that it's haunted with fairies?

Terence
Well, I --

Molly.
You don't believe in fairies? Few do nowadays under the Lord Lieutenant's rule, but Pat and me, we know they're true, don't we?

Murphy.
Yes, Molly.

Molly.
(to Terence) The Fairy Cleena is their queen. Sometimes she takes the shape of a peasant woman, and shows herself, they say. It's the Fairy Cleena herself has taken a fancy to Blind Murphy - she and her small folk do many little things for him - little enough, but helpful to a blind man that has no womenkind of his own. It's few evenings he'll not find his praties peeled for supper - by the small folk - and the water drawn - it's the fairies that do it. We know that now, don't we, Pat?

Murphy.
Yes, Molly, darlin'.

Terence
The Fairy Cleena?

Molly.
Sure enough. We don't tell the other boys. They've left off believing in such things. It's only Pat and me that know the old tale's true, after all.

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