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ACT II - Scene 1

No. 16: FINALE


DORCAS.
    The West wind howls,
The thunder rolls,
  But love keeps warm my heart!
    Oh, mistress dear,
To-night and here,
  Sweet mistress, must we part?

Enter OSWALD.

OSWALD.
  The horses are saddled and dark is the night,
The stars in the firmament favour our flight;
    Each planet its splendour hath graciously veiled;
And the chaste moon herself her effulgence hath paled.
DORCAS.
    But the planets are there,
      Though their glory they hide;
    Though a mask they may wear,
      They will smile on the bride!
    The stars keep their vigils above her;
Oh, Oswald, dear Oswald, I love her.
OSWALD.
    Ah, happy maid,
      A wife so soon to be,
    To be beloved
      By one so fair as thee!
DORCAS.
    Not now! not now!
To love's sweet vow
      I'll listen all life long;
    Sing, love, to me,
And thine I'll be
      And live upon thy song;
But sing not now!
    If they should take her!
      If they should pursue!
    Do not forsake her,
      Oh, my lover true!
    Promise me, Oswald, promise thy bride,
  That, if thou leavst me a maid forlorn,
To weep the day that I e'er was born,
    Thou wilt not leave her side!
OSWALD.
      I swear!

DORCAS. OSWALD.
  Now art thou mine,  
And I
  For ever mine!   for ever thine!

Thunder.

MANNERS. (off)
    Flash, lightning, flash,
  And roll, thou thunder, roll!
    The heavens crash,
  But peace is in my soul;
    For love is there,
      Serene and blest,
Serene and blest,
    And everywhere
      Where love is, there is rest.

Enter MANNERS.

MANNERS. DORCAS & OSWALD.
    Flash, lightning, flash,     Flash, lightning, flash,
  And roll, thou thunder, roll!   And roll, thou thunder, roll!
    Thou canst not crush!     Thou canst not crush!
  Love reigns from pole to pole!     Thou canst not crush!
    And through the black abyss    
  The black abyss above     For love is there,
    Love rolls thee back,     And everywhere
  For thou thyself art love.   Where love is, there is rest.
    Flash, lightning, flash,     Flash, lightning, flash,
  And roll, thou thunder, roll!   And roll, thou thunder, roll!
    Where love is, there is rest.     Where love is, there is rest.

The door opens and DOROTHY appears. DORCAS goes up to close the door.
Exit OSWALD.


MANNERS.
  Oh, heart's desire
    I see thee once again!
  I seem to hear the heavenly choir
    Sing, life is not in vain.
  When thou art nigh, oh, true my
      love,
    Again the sky is blue,
      There is no darkness now!
       
DOROTHY.
  There is no light,
    When thou art far away;
  Thine absence is to me the night,
    Thy presence is the day;
  For when I am with thee,
    With thee, my love,
  Another world I see,
    There is no darkness now!
Dorothy & Manners
   DOROTHY & MANNERS.
  There is no darkness, o, my love!
There is no darkness, o, my love, my love!




Re-enter OSWALD.

OSWALD. The horses are waiting —
DORCAS.   And ready am I!
MANNERS. The storm is abating —
    Come, love, let us fly!
DOROTHY. Oh, grant me one moment!
OSWALD. The horses are waiting —
DOROTHY.   Dear Haddon, good-bye!
MANNERS.   Come, love, let us fly!

DOROTHY.
  Home of my girlhood, so happy, farewell!
I ne'er may look on thee again — Who can tell?
    The sun shine upon thee!
      Farewell!
    Father, oh father, I love thee!
      Good-bye!
    I have tried to obey thee —
      In vain! Sad am I!
    Oh, love me, I pray thee!
      Good-bye! Good-bye!

A crash of thunder. She falls in MANNERS' arms.

DOROTHY.

Why do the heavens roar? Is this thing sin
That I am doing for thy sake? Ghostly the night!

MANNERS. But calm aye follows storm!
DORCAS. Hush! what was that?
OSWALD. Thy heart thine ear deceives.
MANNERS. 'Twas nought!
DORCAS. Again! Again!
DOROTHY. See yonder form!
ALL. (whispered) Hush! (pause) 'Twas but the twinkle of the rustling leaves.
MANNERS. Be not afraid! on my strong arm depend!
DORCAS. See! there is something!
OSWALD. Where?
MANNERS. Amongst the trees.
DORCAS. Yes, there is something moving!
DOROTHY. Saints defend! (pause)
ALL. 'Twas but the branches swaying in the breeze!

MANNERS.
    Now step lightly,
Hold me tightly,
  Creep along by yonder wall.
ALL.
    Now step lightly!
Hold me tightly!
  Where the deepest shadows fall.
    Heaven, befriend us!
Saints defend us!
  Fare thee well, Haddon Hall!
Fare thee well, old Haddon Hall!

DOROTHY. MANNERS. DORCAS & OSWALD.
    Now step lightly,     Now step lightly,
    Fare
thee well!
  Creep along by
yonder wall!
  Creep along by
yonder wall!
    Home of     Hush, step lightly!     Hush, step lightly!
    my girlhood,     Hold me tightly     Hold me tightly
    so happy,
farewell —
  Where the deepest
shadows fall.
  Where the deepest
shadows fall.
    farewell!     Farewell!     Lightly, lightly, lightly,
              Creep along by yonder wall!

ALL.
    Now step lightly,
Hold me tightly!
  Creep along by yonder wall
Where the deepest shadows fall,
Where the deepest shadows fall!
    Now step lightly,
Hold me tightly!
  Lightly let our footsteps fall,
Lightly, lightly, lightly fall,
DOROTHY.
    Lightly, lightly,
DORCAS.
    Lightly, lightly,
MANNERS.
    Lightly, lightly,
OSWALD.
    Lightly fall,
ALL.
    Lightly fall, lightly fall,
Lightly fall, lightly fall!

Exeunt, pursued by the PURITANS.
STORM.


As the storm dies away, the scene changes to THE LONG GALLERY, where
SIR GEORGE, LADY VERNON, and CHORUS are discovered.

ACT II - Scene 2

Enter MAJOR DOMO.

MAJOR DOMO.
  Silence all! Attend your host!
Silence all, and pledge the toast!
SIR GEORGE.
  'Tis an honoured old tradition
    Open house is Haddon Hall;
  Welcome all who seek admission,
    Gentle, simple, great and small.
  Health and wealth to comrades present,
    Welcome one and all the same!
CHORUS.
  Health to peer and health to peasant!
    Health to squire and health to dame!


SIR GEORGE.
  In days of old,
When hearts were bold,
    And the prize of the brave the fair,
  We danced and sang
Till the rafters rang
    And laughter was everywhere!
  Our lives were lives of stress and storm,
But through our veins the blood ran warm —
    We only laughed the more!
We only laughed the more!
In the grand old days of yore!
      For mirth was mirth,
And worth was worth
    In the grand old days of yore!
CHORUS.
    To the grand old days,
To the grand old days,
The grand old days of yore!
The grand old days of yore!
Richard Green as Sir George
Dorothy & Manners

SIR GEORGE.
  Ere life is old,
And hearts grow cold,
    And the autumn gathers grey,
  With soul and voice
In your youth rejoice,
    And merrily keep your May;
  Again let love and manly mirth
And woman's beauty rule the earth
    As beauty ruled before;
As beauty ruled before;
      And once again
Let men be men
    As they were in days of yore,
  And woman's beauty rule the earth
    As beauty ruled before;
      And once again
Let men be men
    As they were in days of yore.
CHORUS.
    To the grand old days,
To the grand old days,
The grand old days of yore!
The grand old days of yore!

Enter RUPERT and MCCRANKIE bearing in DORCAS, followed by the PURITANS.

RUPERT.
  Eloped, eloped! Betrayed, betrayed!
Abetted by this tricksy maid!
McCRANKIE.
    Ech, mon! ech mon! t' dochter's flown!
SIR GEORGE.
    Is this my house, sir, or thine own?
RUPERT.
  Forgive my friend — let me express
My sorrow for his zeal's excess;
    He has only just come
From the Isle of Rum,
  And this is his native evening dress.
SIR GEORGE.
    But why has he come —
LADY VERNON. and DORCAS.
    Yes, why has he come —
CHORUS.
    Yes, why had he come from the Isle of Rum?
SIR GEORGE.
    And having come —
LADY VERNON and DORCAS.
    Yes, having come —
CHORUS.
    Yes, having come from the Isle of Rum —
SIR GEORGE.
    Cannot thy Gaelic friend be dumb?
ALL.
    Although he has come
From the Isle of Rum.
McCRANKIE.
  Eh, mon, eh, mon, ye dinna ken,
The dochter's gane wi' evil men!
SIR GEORGE.
    What is this tale?
LADY VERNON.
    I fear me!
RUPERT.
  This tale I will succinctly tell,
    If you will only hear me.
CHORUS.
  Oh! tell the tale to us as well;
    A tearful tale, I fear me!

RUPERT.
    We were sheltering all
Underneath a wall,
  Very damp and most unhappy;
    And to keep us warm
In the pelting storm —
McCRANKIE.
  We were hae'ing a wee drappie!
PURITANS.
  They were having a wee drappie!
RUPERT.
    We said so, friends!
McCRANKIE.
    We said, we a'
Were bidin' underneath a wa' —
RUPERT & McCRANKIE.
  Very damp — And most/An' maist unhappy!
PURITANS.
    Oh yes, we were damp,
And we all had the cramp,
  But we had no wee drappie!
DORCAS and WOMEN.
  That's why you were unhappy?
PURITANS.
  That's why we were unhappy.
McCRANKIE.
    I was bidin' there
Wi' nae breeks tae wear —
  An' a kilt's a wee bit draughty!
RUPERT.
    When one of the boys
He heard a noise —
McCRANKIE.
  An' we listened cool an' crafty.
SIMEON. (holding up his hand)
    Please, I was the boy —
Who heard the noi-
CHORUS. (much interested)
  And you listened cool and crafty.
RUPERT.
    To voices speaking —
McCRANKIE.
    Footsteeps creaking —
RUPERT and McCRANKIE.
  Then a silence deep and dead.
PURITANS.
    Need we mention
Our attention
  Was bestowed on what they said?
CHORUS.
  And what did the voices say?
Tell us, we pray!
RUPERT. (whispering)
    Hush, step lightly!
McCRANKIE. (whispering)
    Haud me tightly!
RUPERT & McCRANKIE. (whispering)
  Lightly let your footsteps fall —
RUPERT, McCRANKIE andf PURITANS. (whispering)
  Lightly, lightly, lightly fall!
    Now step lightly!
Hold me tightly!
RUPERT and McCRANKIE. (In falsetto)
  Lightly, lightly, lightly fall!
RUPERT.
  Forward I rushed, this saucy vixen grasping!
McCRANKIE.
    Forrit I fell, an' crackt a Scottish croon!
PURITANS.
  Backward we flew, until we pulled up gasping'!
McCRANKIE.
    I rose agen, but some ane knockt me doon!
RUPERT.
  A sound of hoofs against the gravel ringing —
McCRANKIE.
    The cluds disperse, that had obscured the moon —
RUPERT.
  We see a maiden to a horseman clinging!
McCRANKIE.
    We were too late —
PURITANS.
    — Or else we were too soon.

RUPERT. McCRANKIE. PURITANS. WOMEN. MEN.
Too late! Too late,
Too late! they were too late! Or else
Too late! Or else we perhaps they
Too late! we were too soon! they were too soon!
Too late! Too late! Too soon! Too late! Too soon!
Too late! Too late! Too soon! Too late! Too soon!
Too late! Too late! Too soon! Too late! Too soon!
Too late! Too late! Too soon! Too late! Too soon!
Too late! Too late! Too soon! Too late! Too soon!
Too late! Too late! Too soon! Too late! Too soon!

SIR GEORGE.
  What means this tale? Why interrupt our sport,
This intrigue of the kitchen to report?
DORCAS.
    It means that to-morrow
      Thy daughter and pride
    Will be, to thy sorrow,
      Her true lover's bride!
    Away to the water
      They gallantly ride!
Thunder.
SIR GEORGE. To horse — to horse — the fugitives pursue!
CHORUS. To horse — to horse — the fugitives pursue!
RUPERT, McCRANKIE and PURITANS.
  To horse — to horse — but after you!

SIR GEORGE.
  Fleet though the lightning's flash
    Vanish from view,
  Surely the thunder's crash
    Follows anew.
  I will, whatever hap,
    Press through the holt,
  Swift as the thunder-clap
    After the bolt!
OTHERS.
  Fleet though the lightning's flash
    Vanish from view,
SIR GEORGE.
    To horse — to horse!
OTHERS.
  Surely the thunder's crash
    Follows anew.
ALL.
    To horse — to horse —
SIR GEORGE.
  Spare neither steed nor spur!
OTHERS.
    To horse! To horse!
RUPERT, McCRANKIE & PURITANS.
    We will bring up the rear!
ALL.
  To horse! To horse!
    The fugitives pursue,
The fugitives pursue,
The fugitives!
  To horse! to horse! to horse!
    The fugitives pursue,
To horse! the fugitives pusue!

Exeunt SIR GEORGE and a few of the CHORUS, the rest gather round LADY VERNON.

LADY VERNON.
  In vain they will blunder
    Through halt and through brake;
  Never yet did the thunder
    The lightening o'ertake!
 
NANCE, GERTRUDE and DEBORAH.
  Farewell, our gracious hostess,
    Of children both bereft;
  But love, obedience, troops of friends
    Unto thee still are left.
  Not ours to break grief's sacred seal
    And on thy woe to dwell,
  But ours to bend a humble knee
    And bid thee fond farewell.
Farewell! Farewell!
     
CHORUS.
    Time, the Avenger,
Time, the Controller,
  Time, that unravels the tangle of life,
    Guard thee from danger,
Prove thy consoler,
  And make thee again happy mother and wife!

Exeunt LADY VERNON and DORCAS. SERVANTS enter, and extinguish the lights, one by one. The CHORUS disperse, and gradually exeunt.

CHORUS.
  Brief is all life;
Its storm and strife
    Time stills;
  And through this dream
The nameless scheme
    Fulfils
    Until one day
  Through space is hurled
A vacant world,
    Silent and grey,
Until one day
  Through space is hurled
A vacant world,
Through space is hurled
A vacant world,
    Silent and grey —
Silent, silent and grey.

As the lamps are extinguished, the cold light of dawn steals through the windows.
The SERVANTS exeunt, and the curtain falls.

END OF ACT II.


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