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MIDI Symbol

SIMON.
  I would see a maid who dwells in Zolden —
    Her eyes are soft as moonlight on the mere;
  The spring hath fled, the ripened year turns golden —
    Shall I win her ere the waning of the year?
  The reaping-folk pass homeward by the fountain;
    What is it then that calls me from the dell,
  What bids me climb the path beside the mountain
    To the down beyond the sheepfold? Who can tell?
  Then take it, for this magic stone hath power
    To change thee to the fairest; yet to me
  Thou wert fairest as I knew thee in that hour
    When a maiden dwelt in Zolden!
    Ah, take it, ah, take it, 'tis for thee!

JOAN.
  I would see a youth whom comes from
      Freyden —
    He is straighter than the pine trees
      grow;
  Gossips say he comes to woo a maiden,
    So the gossips say — but can they
      know?
  Three laughing maids are in the hollow
    Yet none will set him straight upon his
      way;
  Nay! soft! for he hath found the path to
      follow
    He is coming! little heart, what will he
      say?
  Then take it, for this magic stone hath
      power
    To change thee to the fairest, yet to
      me
  Thou wert fairest as I knew thee in that
      hour
   
When a youth came up from Freyden!
  Ah, take it, ah, take it,'tis for
      thee!

BOTH.
  Then take it, for this stone hath power,
    To change three to the fairest; yet to me!

JOAN. SIMON.
Thou wert fairest in that hour Thou wert fairest as I knew
When a youth came thee
up from Freyden! in Zolden!
Ah, take it, 'tis for thee, for thee! Ah, take it, 'tis for thee, for thee!

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