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Since 1867, Canada had enjoyed a degree of autonomy as a Dominion within the British Empire and in 1880 the Governor General, the Marquis of Lorne, wrote a fervent poem about Canada, which he entitled the "Dominion Hymn". The Marquis, a son-in-law of Queen Victoria, then sent his poem to the Arthur Sullivan and invited him to set the words of the "Dominion Hymn" to music that could be easily sung with the intention that it should become the "National Anthem" of Canada.

But the French-speaking Canadians objected, saying they wanted a "National Anthem" written by French Canadians rather than by two Englishmen, and consequently the intention was never fulfilled.



O Giver of earth's treasure   Inheritors of glory,
  Make Thou our nation strong:     O countrymen! w swear
Pour forth Thine hot displeasure   To guard the flag that o'er ye
  On all who work our wrong!     Shall onward victory bear.
To our remotest border   Wheree'er through earth's far regions
  Let plenty still increase,     It's triple crosses fly
Let Liberty and Order   For God, for home, our legions
  Bid ancient feuds to cease.     Shall win, or fighting die!
                   
    O bless our wide Dominion,       O bless our wide Dominion,
      True freedom's fairest scene.         True freedom's fairest scene.
    Defend our people's union,       Defend our people's union,
      God save our Empire's Queen!         God save our Empire's Queen!

The Marquis of Lorne, 1880

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